Author Archive

Winter Order Form (wk of 1/6/13)

Posted in Uncategorized on January 6, 2013 by foragefiend

Bunny print card by Annie

Elder Fire Farm Arts

Winter Pick-up Order Form

Orders placed by 8pm Monday, and will be available for pick-up

after 10am the following Wednesday at:

Confections with Convictions (116 W. Crosstown Pkwy, Kalamazoo)

Name on order:

  price quantity total
Cultured Veggies
      Classic Kraut 16oz $7.00
      Apple Kraut 16oz $7.00
      Spicy Carrot Pickles 16oz $7.00
      Fennel Onions  8oz $5.00
      Culture Club (mildly) Hot Sauce  5oz $7.00
                            Total cultured veggies
Farmstead Jams 8oz
     Heart of Summer $6.00
     Hot Pepper Jelly $6.00
     Maiden Voyage $6.00
     Spiced Pear $6.00
     Spiced Pear Chutney $6.00
     Sunrise Spread $6.00
     Sunset Spread $6.00
     Tomato Marmalade $6.00
     Tropical Melon Moon $6.00
     Vanilla Ambrosia $6.00
                                    Total Jams
Hand-printed cards by Annie
     Hearts (pack of 3) $5.00
     Stars  (pack of 3) $5.00
     Bunny (pack of 3) $5.00
                                    Total cards
 
                                     Total purchases

 (paid with check or cash at pick up)

All items are available in limited quantities. We will notify you if there is any trouble filling your order.

Thank you for your support.

Please feel free to call (269) 352-4711 or email elderfirefarmarts@gmail.com  with any questions.

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Elder Fire Winter Order Form (wk of 12/16/12)

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 16, 2012 by foragefiend

IMG_1828

Elder Fire Farm Arts

Winter Pick-up Order Form

Orders placed by 8pm Monday, and will be available for pick-up

after 10am the following Wednesday at:

Confections with Convictions (116 W. Crosstown Pkwy, Kalamazoo)

Name on order:

  price quantity total
Cultured Veggies
      Classic Kraut 16oz $7.00
      Apple Kraut 16oz $7.00
      Spicy Carrot Pickles 16oz $7.00
      Fennel Onions  8oz $5.00
      Culture Club (mildly) Hot Sauce  5oz $7.00
                                             Total cultured veggies
Farmstead Jams 8oz
     Heart of Summer $6.00
     Hot Pepper Jelly $6.00
     Maiden Voyage $6.00
     Spiced Pear $6.00
     Spiced Pear Chutney $6.00
     Sunrise Spread $6.00
     Sunset Spread $6.00
     Tomato Marmalade $6.00
     Tropical Melon Moon $6.00
     Vanilla Ambrosia $6.00
                                    Total Jams
Hand-printed cards by Annie
     Hearts (pack of 3) $5.00
     Stars  (pack of 3) $5.00
     Bunny (pack of 3) $5.00
                                    Total cards
 
                                               Total purchases (paid with check or cash at pick up)

All items are available in limited quantities. We will notify you if there is any trouble filling your order.

Thank you for your support.

Please feel free to call (269) 352-4711 or email elderfirefarmarts@gmail.com  with any questions.

Elder Fire Winter Order Form (wk of 12/9/12)

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2012 by foragefiend

IMG_1571

Elder Fire Farm Arts

Winter Pick-up Order Form

 

Orders placed by 8pm Monday, and will be available for pick-up

after 10am the following Wednesday at:

Confections with Convictions (116 W. Crosstown Pkwy, Kalamazoo)

 

Name on order:

  price quantity total
Cultured Veggies      
      Classic kraut  16oz $7.00    
      Fennel Onions  8oz $5.00    
      Culture Club (mildly) Hot Sauce  5oz $7.00    
                                             Total cultured veggies      
Farmstead Jams 8oz      
     Autumnberry Peary $6.00    
     Heart of Summer $6.00    
     Hot Pepper Jelly $6.00    
     Maiden Voyage $6.00    
     Spiced Pear $6.00    
     Spiced Pear Chutney $6.00    
     Sunrise Spread $6.00    
     Sunset Spread $6.00    
     Tomato Marmalade $6.00    
     Tropical Melon Moon $6.00    
     Vanilla Ambrosia $6.00    
                                    Total Jams      
Hand-printed cards by Annie      
     Hearts (pack of 3) $5.00    
     Stars  (pack of 3) $5.00    
     Bunny (pack of 3) $5.00    
                                    Total cards      
       
       
                                               Total purchases

 (paid with check or cash at pick up)

     

 

All items are available in limited quantities. We will notify you if there is any trouble filling your order.

 

Thank you for your support.

Please feel free to call (269) 352-4711 or email elderfirefarmarts@gmail.com  with any questions.

ELDER FIRE FARM ARTS COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE 2013

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on November 7, 2012 by foragefiend

We’re a small diverse farm part of the grassroots effort growing a sustainable and transparent food system, while building trusting/meaningful relationships as producers, consumers, neighbors, and with the land. CSA allows us to deepen and develop these connections by sharing some of the responsibilities and many of the joys of food production. Investing in our farm prior to each season of food production allows us to make it through winter, purchase seeds for the upcoming season and any tools or amendments necessary to continue to do this work in a sustainable way. We then show our thanks by growing great food for you, with passion and sincere gratitude.                                                                                   PICK UPS:

@ WEDNESDAYS 100-MILE MARKET (People’s Food Co-op)

@ SATURDAYS KALAMAZOO FARMERS’ MARKET (Bank St.)

TRADITIONAL C.S.A SHARE                                        

FULL SHARES–$350

18 weeks of FARM ARTS (May 26àSep.22). Each week you can look forward to our selection made just for you of the freshest, seasonal produce, grown using organic methods, which you pick up at either of our Kalamazoo markets. The tried and true way of C.S.A.  Limited availability.

MARKET STYLE C.S.A SHARE

$300 or $500

A pre-pay system that gives us the benefit of start-up season monies and gives you the option to shop at our market table cash free throughout the season, when you want and where you want. We keep the books of how much you’ve spent, but unlike the traditional style, we do not set aside produce or eggs or jams for you, it is a first come first serve membership system.

CONTACT US FOR MEMBERSHIP AGREEMENT FORMS AND WITH YOUR QUESTIONS Elderfirefarmarts@gmail.com    269.352.4711     SEND CHECKS/CASH WITH MEMBERSHIP AGREEMENT FORM BY FEBRUARY 1st 2013 TO: 10400 s. gurd road, dowling, michigan 49050        visit us on facebook https://www.facebook.com/ElderFireFarmArts

Elder Fire Farm Arts

Membership Agreement Form CSA 2013

 Name(s):____________________________________________*Phone:____________________

Address:_______________________________________________________________________

Email(s):___________________________________________________________

CIRCLE THE SHARE TYPE OF YOUR CHOICE:

TRADITIONAL (Full $350)

We grow produce specifically for you—specialties and staples that might not be available forother market goers or market style share members. This is a veggie heavy share that ranges in size each week depending on what’s in season.                                 

Choose your weekly pick up location:

      _____100 Mile Market/Wednesdays/3-7pm(Peoples’ Food Co-op of Kalamazoo)

507 Harrison St, Kalamazoo, MI 49007

_____Kalamazoo (Bank St.) Farmers’ Market/Saturdays/7:30am-12:30pm

1200 Bank St, Kalamazoo, MI 49001

MARKET STYLE (___$300 or ___$500)

Come to either market to buy produce, eggs, jam, whatever’s on our table whenever you want during next year’s market season. We do the bookkeeping each market and keep track of your balance.

Member Agreement

☯  Depending on share type, I will receive a full, weekly share of Elder Fire produce that will vary in size and weight depending on the time of the season.

☯  I agree to support the farmers by sharing in the inherent risks of agriculture (poor weather, drought, hail, crop failure, pest problems, etc.) and the rewards (fresh, local, organically grown fruits, vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, etc. the harvests of a good season). I understand this principle and agree that there is no guarantee on the exact amount or type of produce I will receive in my share. By participating in CSA I am supporting the local farmers (and our foodshed), as well as allowing for more equitable food distribution.

☯  By purchasing a traditional C.S.A share, I commit to picking up my share weekly and understand that if I, or a designated other, is unable to pick up my share it cannot be saved or picked-up at a later date unless prior arrangements have been made with the farmer. As a market style member, I understand the value of my share can be redeemed only during the 2013 growing season and that produce is not set aside for me each week.

___________________________________________________________________________

Member’s Signature                                                                              Date

Please make checks out to Elder Fire Farm Arts and mail to 10400 S. Gurd Rd, Dowling, MI 49050

BY FEBRUARY 1st 2013          

*Enclosed is my check(s) of:  In Full ($300/ $500 or $350)______     OR       Initial Payment of $________with post-dated checks for the following amount $_______ $________=$300 $350 $500

Mary’s (water)Melon Rind Pickles

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on September 5, 2012 by foragefiend

I have been hearing a lot of talk about watermelon rind pickles this season. I am really quite surprised at how many people have been talking and thinking about them. When I was growing up we had watermelon rind pickles at every pickle-worthy family function, which was most all of them, and I have to admit they were not my favorite (sorry, grandma). My grandmother made watermelon rind pickles dutifully every year. Growing up in a time when nothing could afford to go to waste, folks got creative.  I know out here on the farm we have definitely developed the preservation mentality, and it requires a lot of creativity sometimes. Each week we harvest everything that is ready and most all those goodies have but one 4-6 hour chance to go home with some lucky shopper.  What’s left at the end of the farmers’ markets is destined to be salvaged and transformed into something that will last longer than most fresh produce will. I mean, why throw away something that could be eaten? I have been eating SO MANY watermelons it’s just a shame to throw out the rinds–perfectly edible, slightly tart, very crunchy, but in severe contrast to the sweet soft flesh of the ripe insides. So as promised to those following the farm’s  facebook page, I bring you, with the knowledge of my grandmother and some tweaking by me, (mostly) waste free watermelon:

WATERMELON RIND PICKLES

First you need a BIG ol’ watermelon (a few small ones will do). We use an heirloom variety called Chelsea because it has a nice thick rind on it. Peel the skin off the outside. (Now here’s where I recommend altering the recipe slightly.) It says to leave some of the inside pink on “for color” but I will tell you that this technique also makes it slightly slimey and kinda makes you feel like you’re eating someone else’s leftovers. You do what you want… that is just my opinion. Cut into bite-sized chunks. You should end up with about 8 cups.

Now dissolve 1/2 cup pickling salt in 8 cups of water and soak the rind in the brine for 4 hours or overnight. Drain and rinse well.

Cover the rind with cold water, bring to boil for 8 minutes or until tender. Drain and put in large non-reactive vessel.

Bring 2 cups sugar, 2 cups white vinegar, 2 thinly sliced lemons or limes, 2t whole cloves (or 1/2t clove oil),  2t allspice whole, 4 cinnamon sticks (or 1t cinnamon oil) to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Pour of the rind and keep submerged for 24 hours.

DAY2:

Drain off the brine into a pan and add another 1 cup of sugar. Boil until dissolved. Pour over rind and keep submerged for 24 hours.

DAY3:

Drain off the brine into a pan and add another 1 cup of sugar. Bring to a boil. Add the rind and bring back to boil.

Pack rind into hot sterilized pint jars with a cinnamon stick from the brine in each. Fill with brine leaving a 1/2 inch of headspace and process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Enjoy in the dark of winter and think of summer! Be happy that you just transformed something you would’ve  composted into something yummy!

Top 15 reasons to LOVE farming!

Posted in Uncategorized on September 9, 2011 by foragefiend

In no particular order:

Farming is a time to CONNECT with the EARTH everyday and an opportunity to OBSERVE and LEARN from it.

Farming provides the Rugged SATISFACTION of having worked an entire day outdoors in FREEZING weather, knee deep snow, pouring RAIN, or dripping SWEAT

Farming is FOOD: It is okay to talk about, make and eat food ALL day long

Farming is being a FOOD ACTIVIST (passionately  part of a sustainable local food system/ economy everyday)

Farming is EFFICIENCY: working and exercising at the same time

I get to spend everyday WITH my FAMILY when I’m a Farmer

Going out and PICKING whatever I want for DINNER (and it’s all fresh and grown to my standards of cleanliness)

Sitting around as a family and COMPARING MUSCLES

Connecting GOOD FOOD with HAPPY PEOPLE twice each week at FARMERS’ MARKETS

Farming is the most DIRECT method of PROVIDING for my family and myself

Farming INSPIRES CREATIVITY

To farm is to LIVE OUTSIDE of just about EVERY BOX

I LOVE seeing my KIDS take PRIDE and OWNERSHIP over our farm vision (just like I fantasized they would!)

Farming fosters UNDERSTANDING and APPRECIATION for where our food comes from and what it takes to get it to you and me

If you have never worked on a small vegetable farm (where most work and harvest is done by hand), I STRONGLY recommend at least one day. Through the course of a growing season you can get a pretty clear picture of what each crop (and farmer) goes through to get to your table each week. You may never see CARROTS or SALAD the same way AGAIN!

HOT scenes from today’s harvest!

Posted in Uncategorized on September 2, 2011 by foragefiend

I don’t know how hot
 it is today, but after the last couple of weeks of the

down comforter at night, the 90+ degree days are something I was patiently waiting until next summer to feel again.

 It makes for one hot harvest, so we get up early and work till it gets hot and then finish up later in the day. It’s a nice relief to be sitting at the computer in the shade and take a little time to whip up some blueberry lime-alade (Mitchell transitional blueberries, and crystallized citrus rinds that have been curing for a couple of months, all turned in to a marmalade type condiment (the follow-up to peach-orange marmalade made late last night.)), and, of course, kale wraps with our favorite ton-o-parsley dressing. small shining lights melon-- moments before being eatenEach harvest day is a little different around here.

Depending on the weather and because we don’t have cold storage (a cooler) everything must be fresh (that’s how we like it anyway). We plan out each harvest day in whatever way to best keep things happy and fresh from the time we pick them to the time you  take them home.   On some days greens get picked early in the morning and are either packed up and stored in the shade or it might spend the day lounging around in the icy water  bath drawn up from our well.  Some days we pick it last thing at night or even by the dawn’s early light  before we leave for market (which is not very light anymore). Tomatoes, cukes, melons are not so sensitive and can be picked just about any time before the market when we aren’t picking the picky-er items. Basil and other herbs can be very tricky! Basil doesn’t like water, heat, or cool…but I think we are starting to figure this heat of the summer  show-stopper out.

Harvest days are our favorite days to commune with all the plants and really examine things. We often get distracted visiting other plants we haven’t seen in in the last day or two, discovering how they’ve been doing while we were off doing other things. The pace of harvest day is usually so peaceful. There is no machines here to break nature’s overwhelming “silence” from manmade noise. The only sounds are those of the birds and insects communicating with each other,  the breeze, the each crop’s unique harvest sound, occasionally the rumble of hummingbird wings, sometimes a rain storm,  and lately a lot of us cracking open watermelons to cool us in the middle of the field (our favorite place to eat watermelon).